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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
, there is a bogyman around washington. european style socialism, and it is coming to get us. there are a lot of people who say you want european-style socialism, which causes me to wonder and tremble -- it is it going to be like england? germany? france? the most insidious thing is to build europe's government system and to some big threat to the united states. 27 nations in the european union alone is like any other part of the world. some things are better than others, some work better than others. some things are a threat to the way we do things here if we were to adopt them, and there is not much chance of that. they would feel the way we do things a threat to the way they do things. the differences -- rather than being in a bunker worrying about the dreadful socialism coming across the atlantic, we should really just look and see what works better and incorporate it. we always have done, even the language we speak here, coming from over there. actually, two languages spoken here come from over there. let's take a look at other countries, let's see what works, and improve them if necessary. we do
, that much we know. anything else that you can tell us about this young man? >> we know very little about him at all. he attended an international school in switzerland, classmates say that he was a fan of the american nba basketball league. other than that we know very little. he is thought to be around 27 years old. perhaps not the most impressive person to take over the running of one of the bombers -- one of the world's most authoritarian countries. >> how are people reacting in south korea? of >> huge reaction. north korea is one of the world's most totalitarian governments. people are used to predicting its demise. here for the first time in a long time we potentially have a sense of the moment that change, a subtle shift. it might not look like a coronation, but definitely a sense that something is going on and people are very interested. >> thank you, john. joining the in the studios is john hamm, international studio analyst. there is no question that something important is happening. >> definitely. it is clear that this is the first step in anointing him as the successor. >> i asked
they stay mentally and physically hit. we have an expert giving us insight into how they're coping. >> they are surviving as a group. not as a bunch of individuals. the psychological management from the surface takes that into account. we are dealing with them as a group and we understand that the secret of their well-being is treating them as a group and not as different individuals. >> speaking to my colleague, timothy wilcox, he joins us live from the mine had. tim, obviously rejoicing, we have seen the pictures, but the fact of the matter is that there is sort of a long ways to go. >> absolutely right. no one is getting any precise readings on when this could be brought to the surface, although we are hearing that it could be sooner than the beginning of november. the man that you were just listening to their, he was saying within a month. we could be looking at the middle of next month. drilling, as seen behind me, moving in from the oil industry, continuing all live long, yesterday reaching 78 meters with a capacity for drilling a very wide bore very quickly, but it keeps on
. it was leaked to the u.s. media somehow. people always say that it was a deliberate leak. i do not think it was. i do not think they have tourr in of criminal evidence arrest anybody. >> thank you india has launched a biometric id scheme. it will put more than 1 billion citizens on a database. it is hoping the database will give an accurate picture of indian society. the european commission appears set to defer legal action against france over its expulsion of thousands of roma migrants. a senior european commissioner compared to events during world war ii. the u.s. senate is investigating the release of the lockerbie bombing. medical experts and state department officials will be questioned about the scottish departments decision. key witnesses from the uk have rejected requests to attend. are scotland correspondent reports. >> it has been months since he was freed from prison to fly home to his family and libya. he was released on compassionate grounds by scottish government. >> imposed by a higher power, is rts in anyo course in a jurisdiction in any land can revoke or overruled. it is final
violating the rights of detainee's. the u.s. and european union's have welcomed the turkish referendum on constitutional changes. 60% of voters backed the referendums. they are aimed at bringing turkey more in line with the european union, which the government wants to join costs -- wants to join. flex the turkish prime minister had good reason to be delighted with these results. >> september the 12th will go down in history as a turning point in turkish democracy. you will always be remembered for this, we will always be remembered for this period september 12 has turned to a bright page with this referendum and a milestone for democracy. >> proving once again that he can win the support of voters when it counts, putting him in a strong position before next year's general election. but this has been a bitterly contested referendum with both sides trading insults. in the heat of a campaign there was little opportunity to inform the public of what they were being asked to inform upon or reject. los were not clear as to whether they trusted the main party. the opposition party ran a spir
small amount of a banned substance. u.s. lawmakers put pressure on china to raise the value of the wan -- yuan. welcome to "bbc world news." still to come this hour, a boost for berlusconi as his government wins the vote of confidence. the survival of his coalition remains on a knife edge. delhi is almost ready for the start of the commonwealth games, but years later. -- but fears linger. workers have taken to the streets across europe in a day of protest against the austerity measures being imposed by national governments. there have been demonstrations in greece, ireland, and latvia. tens of thousands travel to brussels to march on european union headquarters. in spain, there is a general strike. >> large crowds were on the streets in madrid this evening supporting spain's first general strike in eight years. the message repeated here and elsewhere in europe today was no to austerity. before dawn, strikers were at madrid transport depot trying to prevent buses leaving. spanish unions wanted to shut down the capital and demonstrate that the people were against spending cuts. later, co
. but the australian people told us in no uncertain terms on that day and the days that followed is this -- that we will be held more accountable than ever before. >> the election august 21 ended in deadlock. neither julia gillard nor tony abbott's liberal coalition succeeded in forming a government. the arithmetic was not balanced. yesterday, it was neck and neck. do you get right -- julia gillard had 74 seats. tony abbott had 73. first, a vote for tony abbott, giving both sides 74 seats. but then the but -- two for julia gillard. last week, the opposition leader tony abbott described himself as the head of the government in waiting. today, he was forced to concede. >> the coalition won more seats than our opponents, but sadly, we did not get the opportunity to form a government. >> there has not been a hung parliament here since the second world war. australians are used to strong and decisive government. this one looks altogether more for agile and raises the question -- how long will it last? nick bryant, bbc news, sydney. >> and six months after their election in iraq, still no government. gab
the government to help us. >> but the numbers are overwhelming. at last count, 18.6 million people have been affected, and losses could exceed 28 billion pounds. the government has promised initial payment of 120 pounds. the 13-year-old wants to be a doctor. she and all these children are living in classrooms next door. they and their families will be homeless again soon when school starts. >> let's round of some other main news. he said he made a mistake in accusing syria of assassinating his father. he was killed in 2005. he describes his words as a political accusation made too quickly. syria has always denied involvement. rescue teams have resumed their search for survivors of mud slide. authorities say 44 people have died. thousands more are at risk of flooding and landslides. south african trade unions have suspended their strike. more than 1 million civil servants will see the pay rise. union members say they will consider the latest offer. the spanish government has dismissed a cease-fire as insufficient after it said it will halt its violent campaign. the interior minister says they
and confusion took us inside the generation that is transforming china. >> i came back to china for only one reason, its opportunity. >> narrator: lu dong had just returned from a decade abroad.: 32 and single, he was working at a software start-up in the northern city of dalian. >> hisoft does software outsourcing. this is like the factory of engineers. what's amazing is we are doubling the size every half a year. i spent two months already. i'm going to spend another ten months here and invest my life here. you know, i love this place. this is our new building, 18th floor. it's going to be finished by november or december. i think this is like the symbol of the growing of china-- one floor every week. >> narrator: so many young people were coming back from abroad that the chinese nicknamed them "returning turtles." ben wu had also just come back to beijing, where he grew up. >> i have been away for over a decade in the u.s. and never worked in china before. so i want to learn how chinese conduct business, what's the best opportunity in what industry. from monday to friday i work for mckin
you for bringing us up today with the verdict. joining me in the studios is a businessman and philanthropist of south asian concern with peace initiatives in india. you just heard that with me. the judges appeared to have given the site to hindus. >> which oversight got it, my appeal would be that the issue is de-politicized. there is a risk of that political parties who have thrived on this division, they may seek to be opportunistic. the first is to appeal to all parties concerned. to seek a national unity on the issue. to allow the rule of law to prevail. we cannot afford what happened before and what continues to happen when a verdict against i. >> what do you sense of the sentiment on the ground? >> there is a state of anxiety. people are willing to have the local populace be calm, whatever the verdict. this is a test for the indian government and all political parties, and for the people -- will civic society prevail? will trust in the judicial process that has taken two decades prevail? >> as we understand from our correspondent a could go on again with a possible a
. they all looked relaxed as the journalists were ushered out. they will not be behind closed doors. >> the u.s. middle east envoy, george mitchell, described some of the key issues address during that meeting at the state department. >> both prime minister netanyahu and president abbas condemn all forms of violence that target innocent civilians and pledged to work together to maintain security. they reiterated their common goal of two states for two peoples, and to a solution to the conflict that resolved all issues, and is all claims, and establishes a viable state of palestine alongside a secure state of israel -- ends all claims. president abbas and prime minister netanyahu agreed that these negotiations can be completed within one year and that the aim of the negotiations is to resolve all core issues. >> george mitchell there. now, a look at some of the day's other top stories. the afghan president says a nato air strike has mistakenly killed 10 election campaign workers in the north of the country's peak -- north of the country. convoy vehicles carrying election workers had been attacke
and they will do it. >> traditional rulers are better. they know our problems. they are dealing with us directly, so they know our problems. >> they are very careful with that. traditional rulers like to protect their personality. they tell you they will make sure. >> over the years, under both military and civilian rule, the power of these cheats and scammers has steadily been eroding. how did they continue -- the power of these chiefs and emirs has steadily been eroding. how do they continue their hold on power? >> date rule along with traditional institutions. it is not set in the media, but it is there. there are signs it will always be there and the people will always follow through on what the traditional institutions want. >> the history and culture of this place dates back centuries and little has changed in terms of tradition. i have come to meet an eim mir, granted a special audience. >> we do not order people to vote for anybody. all we do is ensure that our subjects do abide by the rule of the election. we do that to further the rule of the government. there should not be any discrim
given a hero's welcome on his return to china. do stay with us, if you can, on "bbc world news." . still to come -- fresh hope for the chilean miners. how are the men coping belowground? first though, for days, there have been doubts about delhi's readiness for the commonwealth games. now the athletes are going in. for six days, officials have been pulling out all the stops. >> members of the nigerian team were arriving in the airport'. the anglin contingent started moving into the games village -- the england that contingent started moving into the games region. there is still a lot of work being done. frantic construction is carrying on, and the army has rebuilt the bridge that collapsed last week. they are feeling the heat, but they still found time. they are confident that eventually everything will be in top shape. >> we are cleaning up the rooms. but the public areas. -- the public areas we have also said that everyone has to work double time. >> most of the venues are being restored as the elite troops to go about securing them. india is taking a chances. >> the preparations are a
father's successor. >> stay with us if you cannot on bbc world news. still to come -- a fifth of the world's plant species are now in danger of disappearing forever. first, she is said to be one of the most photographed people on our planet. a new exhibition of formal photographs document the life of britain's queen elizabeth in pictures. many were taken by her late sister's husband, the photographer lord snowden. >> on her right, mr. anthony armstrong jones. >> he was a society photographer who took pictures of the royals and then became one. tony armstrong jones's wedding to princess margaret was the society event of 1960. although he was not a member of the royal family, lord snowden continued to work as a professional photographer. alongside his documentary work, he was often called on to photograph the queen. many of his photographs have been included in a new exhibition, but the graphic portraits of the queen. here is an image of the monarch and her husband in the kind of formal pose you might expect, and the queen caught by a range of photographers' in less orthodox sur
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)